friendly french people and the buzzing of cicadas.

You know, it is really something to be a perfect stranger walking around a tiny French village, and have everyone sing out 'bonjour!' as you pass. It's like the opening scenes from Beauty and the Beast, pretty much to a tee. 'There goes the baker with his bread like always...'

Toulouse was beautiful. I was only there for a few hours, but managed to find a nice tea house on a side street where I consumed crepes and smoked black tea while reading about Sarkozy's suspicious amount of high-powered friends in the French media. 

Chocolatey crepe goodness. Mmmmmmm...

From the train station at Toulouse I went to Narbonne, where I was picked up by my host/hostess and delivered to what could be considered paradise:

Kind of like Armstrong, without the Jenna.

The weather is around 33 and sunny everyday, with a bit of breeze to keep things tolerable. There are vinyards all over, and the fort you see kind of in the distance to the left is called 'Beaufort', a 12th century construction which is kept up so that the local wine can be named after it. Speaking of which...

Wine and cheese... OUI S'IL VOUS PLAIT!

Is there anything better than finishing a meal with 3 kinds of chevre and a roquefort on baguette, with a fresh local wine to top it off? No, no there is not.

Yesterday morning I went to the market at Olonzac and received samples from extremely friendly market venders. I love food markets and Olonzac is a charming setting for taste-testing olives, pesto, cheese, and sausages.

I'll take two of everything.

I've walked and biked around the area, which positively buzzes with what I suppose are grasshoppers and cicadas. Tonight we're going to Carcasonne which claims to have invented cassoulet. I don't think I'll be partaking this time around, as it's quite a heavy dish and better suited to chilly winter nights. But I hear Carcasonne is beautiful so I'm really looking forward to it.